Tag Archives: Jillian Larkin

DIVA by Jillian Larkin

DIVA, Volume Three of Jillian Larkin’s THE FLAPPERS series, picks up where INGENUE left off.

Gloria has been let out of jail on condition that she work for the FBI. This involves going to a fancy mansion on Long Island, and participating in all the partying that goes on. This part of the novel is really a re-telling of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, aimed towards a younger audience.

At least, in this third (and last) novel, Ms. Larkin ties up all the loose threads, and we feel as if our young friends can now get on with their lives, as they are now more mature after a considerable amount of heartbreak. Suitable for tweens and teens. Four stars.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Book Review

INGENUE by Jillian Larkin

INGENUE, Volume Two of Jillian Larkin’s THE FLAPPERS series, picks up where VIXEN left off.

Everyone is now in New York. Gloria and Jerome are trying to hide from the mob. Vera, Jerome’s younger sister is frantically looking for them. Marcus has fallen for Clara, who is trying to keep away as her former life as the Queen of the Flappers beckons. And Lorraine is trying to get back at everyone who hurt her in VIXEN.

A fast entertaining read, this novel will give today’s teens something new to think about. Four stars.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Book Review

VIXEN by Jillian Larkin

Jillian Larkin’s VIXEN is the first volume of her series THE FLAPPERS set between 1923 and 1925 in Chicago and later in New York. What is remarkable about this novel is the use of such wonderful flapper slang as “spifflicated,” “jake,” “swooney,” “sheik,” and “sheba.”

This first novel is set in Chicago, as a group of 17-year-old high school seniors skip school to go to speakeasies for a night on the town. Unfortunately, they get embroiled with the mob.

This first novel sets up the problems that wind through the rest of the series. So we learn that rich debutante Gloria Carmody falls for a black musician. That Clara, her cousin, has left a racy past back in New York. And that Lorraine has been accepted by Barnard in New York, conveniently across the street from Columbia, where her heartthrob Marcus is going.

As you can tell from the description, this is not serious stuff, and it is aimed at a young audience. There is nothing here about shell shock, or about the horrors of the Great War. However, if you like your 1920s served lite, this is the book for you. Four stars.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Book Review