Tag Archives: Indie Presses

Indie Presses

For those of you who would like to have the pleasure of hefting your novel in your hand as a codex of weight, extension and form, but don’t want to get sucked into the clanking machinery of big publishing conglomerates, Indies presses are the way to go. You might be surprised by how many of them there are. Because of the nature of the business, Indie presses tend to be niche enterprises. Some only publish poetry. Some want short stories or novellas. But there are some that do novels.

If you have written a novel that is set in a particular geographic region, you might want to consider contacting an Indie press in that region, because Indie presses like to cultivate local authors. For example, when I mentioned that my second novel HE MUST BE SOMEONE is set in Georgetown, Washington D. C., Ed Perlman, the owner of Entasis Press which is based in Washington D. C., visibly brightened.

You might wonder what is going to happen to Indie presses in light of recent turmoil in the publishing industry. I mean, aren’t books going the way of the dodo? And doesn’t that mean that their days are numbered? Not according to the Association of Writers and Writing Programs (AWP) whose annual conference I attended at the beginning of February. Several small presses showed interest in digital apps such as Ampersand that display poetry on digital readers with the correct line breaks.

To read more, click here.

–Cynthia Haggard writes novels.  She is currently seeking representation for HE MUST BE SOMEONE,  a novel about identity, forbidden love and family secrets. For more on her creative writing, go to spunstories. (c) 2011. All rights reserved.

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Filed under Conferences, How to Publish Your Novel

I go to AWP

The Association of Writers and Writing Programs (AWP) holds a conference every year. I had never been before, and I went to see the Book Fair, meet some friends, and sit in on some of the sessions.

The most impressive thing about this conference is the Book Fair, which is huge. I’ve never seen so many representatives of indie presses all together in one room. I had a wonderful time walking up and down each row as I looked for presses that might be interested in publishing my novels. (This is my Plan B. Plan A, is still to get representation. Plan C is to self-publish).

I also had time to sit in on the sessions, and it was an interesting experience. I should say, first of all, that in my professional life I am a medical writer with a science background. I’m used to people who deal in facts, and always support what they say either by producing relevant data, or by making an argument.

So I was bemused to find myself in a session listening to five people talking around the issue of whether workshops actually work.

This is an important question because workshops are the backbone of MFAs and many writing conferences, so it is important to know if they don’t work and why. I sat in the audience for 75 minutes, without hearing one person explain exactly what the problems with workshops were. I heard two people say that they were problematic, two people say they were not problematic, and one person give a lit-critty deconstructional analysis.

I was puzzled. After all, if you don’t state what the problems are, how can you possibly find a remedy?

Next: I join a book club.

Image: mymcpl.org

–Cynthia Haggard writes novels.  She is currently seeking representation for HE MUST BE SOMEONE,  a novel about identity, forbidden love and family secrets. For more on her creative writing, go to spunstories. (c) 2011. All rights reserved.


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Filed under About Cynthia, Conferences, How to Publish Your Novel, News & Notes, Promoting Yourself